Tag Archives: David Fincher

Zodiac is an elusive subject to capture

25 Sep

ZODIAC-FILM

Director David Fincher makes an attempt to capture the most elusive and mysterious figure in law enforcement history. He is no stranger to serial killers, but his interpretation of Zodiac by Robert Graysmith (Jake Gyllenhaal) gives audiences a front row seat to Graysmith’s obsession with the infamous case that terrorized Northern California and frustrated investigators for decades.

Fincher’s visual style and attention to detail are impeccable. He takes his time with the characters and attempts to replicate these events as accurately as possible from Graysmith’s perspective, but it does lead to a slow pace and a long run time. The cast is formidable, however, Gyllenhaal’s performance isn’t nearly as strong  as Mark Ruffalo as Detective Dave Toschi and Robert Downey Jr. as Paul Avery.  It is difficult to satisfy audiences with such an ending, but Fincher remains true to the story and keeps “Hollywood” out of it as much as possible.

WORD COUNT: 151

Adam’s Grade: B+

Chuck’s Grade: B

Panic Room is a safe bet

14 Nov

David Fincher creates a suspenseful thriller that builds tension throughout the film that will keep audiences gripping tight to their armchairs.

Meg Altman (Jodie Foster) is a recently divorced woman trying to find a new place to live with her diabetic daughter Sarah (Kristen Stewart). She is considerable wealthy and purchases a house that has a customized panic room with enough features to endure any kind of intrusion. On the first night they move in, three felons break into the house looking for a particular item that happens to be in locked in the panic room.

I was on the edge of my seat and found myself getting lost in Foster’s excellent performance. Fincher’s fantastic camera work heightens the film’s suspense, which helps alleviate the moments the film falls into some Hollywood cliché material, but I can forgive these minor flaws because Fincher can turn the ordinary into the extraordinary. Panic Room is a safe bet for an entertaining thriller.

WORD COUNT: 150

Adam’s Grade: B+

Chuck’s Grade: B

Se7en is so good it could be a sin

18 Oct

David Fincher’s Se7en is one of the most visceral and visually captivating films I’ve ever seen. Darius Khondji (Director of Photography) and Fincher collaborate to create an urban environment that is almost unlivable. William Somerset (Morgan Freeman) is a detective preparing for retirement and his replacement, Det. David Mills (Brad Pitt) is a hot-head transfer that doesn’t understand Somerset’s city. The detectives become involved in a sadistic serial killer case known as John Doe, whose murders methods correspond to the seven deadly sins.

Andrew Kevin Walker’s brilliant script uses some standard crime-thriller fare, but overall writes a unique screenplay that focuses on the aftermath of the murders. His genius is keeping the killer a mystery, until the final thirty minutes, not to mention devising one of the greatest endings of all time. Fincher and Walker have created a dark and unforgettable masterpiece that seduce people into repeated viewings. Se7en is so good it could be a deadly sin.

WORD COUNT: 158

Adam’s Grade: A

Chuck’s Grade: A+

Fight Club is a beautiful and unique snowflake

5 Oct

Fight Club is a very faithful adaptation to Chuck Palahnuik’s popular book. The plot follows an unnamed protagonist played by Edward Norton, he is “everyman” who find himself living a life with no meaning. He attends support groups for ailments he does not have and becomes embroiled in a relationship with Marla (Helena Bonham Carter). He befriends a man Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), who helps him find his true self through fight club.

David Fincher creates a stylistic world filled with rich characters and plot that twists, turns and leaves you guessing until the very end. As Tyler Durden says, “We are a generation raised by women, sometimes I wonder if another woman is the answer we really need.” Fight Club depicts a real angst many men feel in today’s desensitize society filled with consumerism, loneliness, and nihilism. Everything in the film is top-notch: acting, directing, cinematography, set-design, and story. This is my (Adam) favorite movie of all time.

Word Count: 160

Adam’s Grade: A+

Chuck’s Grade: A+