Tag Archives: Clint Eastwood

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

4 Apr

THE-GOOD-THE-BAD-AND-THE-UGLY

This review opens with cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli assembling a stunning wide-angle shot of this blog while composer Ennio Morricone fills the moment of silence with his amazing, original score. I stare at the keyboard with an itchy finger waiting to press return. Sergio Leone’s signature western, The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly continues to be an international sensation forty-five years later. The story about three distinctly different gunslingers with a history with one another search for a shipment of confederate gold. Although, Eastwood and Van Cleef get all the glory for being the ultra-cool cowboys, it is Eli Wallach that pushes the action forward and keeps the movie moving towards its big payday. In this film, Leone is able to put everything together in the right spots and make the best of film of the Dollars trilogy, as well as the most iconic western of all time. This critic presses publish and rides off into the sunset.

WORD COUNT: 159

Chuck’s Grade: A

Adam’s Grade: A

The Outlaw Josey Wales steers westerns down the right path

24 Sep

Clint Eastwood’s The Outlaw Josey Wales is a revisionist western that takes an unapologetic look at the “horrors” of war. The film is often talked about being a post-commentary on the Vietnam War, but I think it is less about war and more about the revenge of a man wronged by an oppressive group that did not fear any sort of retribution because they were on the “winning” side. This film borrows from a combination of John Wayne movies and Sergio Leone’s anti-heroes to make this hybrid film that will change the perception of Westerns for decades to come.

Wales character wants to fight a one-man war, but he is forced to take take on a couple Native American characters, as well as a naive pioneer family. Wales reluctantly softens his steadfast ways and accepts the fact that all of these characters are trying to begin again, like him. Josey Wales steers the Western genre down the right path.

WORD COUNT: 159

Chuck’s Grade: A+

Adam’s Grade: B

J. Edgar’s career makes for a long movie

6 Sep

Clint Eastwood directs Leonardo DiCaprio as the controversial FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. I cannot speak on the accuracy of the biopic, but Eastwood drives home the fact that Hoover was a patriot that would “protect” the United States by any means necessary–legally and illegally.  Basically, the film recounts the man’s major achievements in law enforcement, as well as reveal the relationship he shared with his long time Associate Director, Clyde Tolson (Armie Hammer). I think Eastwood could have went deeper with both areas. It felt like he was only willing to open the door a crack to let us peep in, but never really allow us to look to long. DiCaprio turns in another great performance and Judi Dench’s role as Hoover’s mother is perfection.

For me, this film was wonderful to watch at home, but I don’t think I would have been comfortable sitting in a theater watching this story about a hard to like political figure.

WORD COUNT: 159

Chuck’s Grade: B-

Adam’s Grade: C